Green Bay Wisconsin home of the Green Bay Packers

Green Bay Packers Football

February 6th, 2011 Super Bowl XLV

The sweetest Green Bay Packer victory EVER. First of all. This Super Bowl came down to the last fifty six seconds. It was a great match up. It was not a blow out. In the first two Super Bowls, Oakland and Kansas City just did not match up with the Green Bay Packers. These were not close games. Nobody thought that the Green Bay Packers were not going to win those games. Nobody took the AFC that seriously. In 1996 with the Holmgren and Brett Favre era and the New England Patriots. The whole season was a march to the Super Bowl. You knew it was coming. It was destiny and everyone expected they would win and the Patriots just were not that good.

What made the 2011 Super Bowl so sweet was that the Pittsburgh Steelers were such an outstanding team. This was also the most improbable season for the Green Bay Packers. They were seeded sixth. Their over-all record was not great. They lost to the Detroit Lions. They played every one of their playoff games on the road. They had to beat Michael Vick in Philadelphia. They had to go to Atlanta and beat them. They had to go to Soldier Field and beat the Chicago Bears at home in the NFC Championship game, which was a mini super bowl all by itself. And then they had to go and play the Steelers who were probably the best team in the NFL, on paper. Nobody could have been sure that they would win that game until that last Pittsburgh play. Even when the Pack was up 14 to 0, you did not know if that was enough because the Steelers were so great. So, even after going through this whole season of adversity and the playoffs and then to hold out until the last minute, the Packers were able to pull off the sweetest victory of all time.

Super Bowl XLV: Pittsburgh Steelers 25 - Green Bay Packers 31
  1 2 3 4 Total
Packers 14 7 0 10 31
Steelers 0 10 7 8 25

 

Green Bay, Wisconsin schools are closing early today, 2/7/2011, so that family members can welcome the Green Bay Packers football team back to town after their 31- 25 Super Bowl win.

The Packers are planning a "Return To Titletown" celebration on Tuesday at Lambeau Field from 4 to 5 p.m., with tickets priced at $5.

 


 

2008 Pre-Season Schedule for the Green Bay Packers
Date Opponent
Time
TV
Results
Mon., Aug. 11 Cincinnati Bengals
Bishop's Charities Game
7 p.m.
ESPN
Sat., Aug. 16 At: San Francisco 49ers
8 p.m.
Fri., Aug. 22 At: Denver Broncos
8 p.m.
Thurs., Aug. 28 Tennessee Titans
Midwest Shrine Game
7 p.m.

 

2008 Regular Season Schedule for the Green Bay Packers
Date Opponent
Time
TV
Results
Mon., Sept. 8 Minnesota Vikings
6 p.m.
ESPN  
Sun., Sept. 14 At: Detroit Lions
12 noon
FOX  
Sun., Sept. 21 Dallas Cowboys
7:15 p.m.
NBC  
Sun., Sept. 28 At: Tampa Bay Buccaneers
12 noon
FOX  
Sun., Oct. 5 Atlanta Falcons
12 noon
FOX  
Sun., Oct. 12 At: Seattle Seahawks
3:15 p.m.
FOX  
Sun., Oct. 19 Indianapolis Colts
3:15 p.m.
CBS  
Sun., Oct. 26 Open
   
Sun., Nov. 2 At: Tennessee Titans
12 noon
FOX  
Sun., Nov. 9 At: Minnesota Vikings
12 noon
FOX  
Sun., Nov. 16 Chicago Bears
*12 noon
FOX  
Mon., Nov. 24 At: New Orleans Saints
7:30 p.m.
ESPN  
Sun., Nov. 30 Carolina Panthers
*12 noon
FOX  
Sun., Dec. 7 Houston Texans
*12 noon
CBS  
Sun., Dec. 14 At: Jacksonville Jaguars
*12 noon
FOX  
Mon., Dec. 22 At: Chicago Bears
7:30 p.m.
ESPN  
Sun., Dec. 28 Detroit Lions
*12 noon
FOX  

* NFL flexible scheduling may shift start times


2007 Schedule for the Green Bay Packers (Brett Favre's Last Season)

Date
Opponent
Time
TV
Results
Sept. 9th, Sun.
Philadelphia Eagles
Noon
Won: 16-3
Sept. 16th, Sun.
At: New York Giants
Noon
Won: 35-13
Sept. 23rd, Sun.
San Diego Chargers
Noon
Won: 31.24
Sept. 30th, Sun.
At: Minnesota Vikings
Noon
Won: 23-16
Oct. 7th, Sun.
Chicago Bears
7:15 p.m.
Lost: 20-27
Oct. 14th, Sun.
Washington Reds
Noon
Won: 17-14
Bye
Oct. 29th, Mon.
At: Denver Broncos
7:30 p.m.
Won: 19-13
Nov. 4th Sun.
At: Kansas City Chiefs
Noon
FOX
Won: 33-22
Nov. 11th, Sun.
Minnesota Vikings
Noon
FOX
Won: 34-0
Nov. 18th, Sun.
Carolina Panthers
Noon
FOX
Won: 31-17
Nov. 22nd, Thurs.
At: Detroit Lions
Noon
FOX
Won: 37-26
Nov. 29th, Thurs.
At: Dallas Cowboys
11:30 a.m.
NFLN
Lost: 27-37
Dec. 9th, Sun.
Oakland Raiders
Noon
FOX
Won: 38-7
Dec. 16th, Sun.
At: St. Louis Rams
Noon
FOX
Won: 33-14
Dec. 23rd, Sun.
At: Chicago Bears
Noon
FOX
Lost: 7-35
Dec. 30th, Sun.
Detroit Lions
Noon
Won: 34-13
Jan. 12th, Sat
Seattle Seahawks
3:30 p.m.
Won: 42-20
Jan. 20, Sun
New York Giants
5:30 p.m.
FOX
Lost 23-20 OT

 

 

Opinion: Packers' treatment of Favre is pure insanity
Team tried to smear future Hall of Famer and created ridiculous circus
OPINION
By Bryan Burwell
updated 2:17 p.m. CT, Wed., Aug. 6, 2008
For months now, I’ve been looking at the Brett Favre saga and tried to understand why it has come to this. And now I get it. This is about the dumbest thing I’ve ever seen.

This shotgun divorce between the Green Bay Packers and their living legend has finally reached the point of sheer insanity as Favre has once again been told by the franchise whose championship legacy he helped redefine, basically to get lost.

“Well I think insanity is a bit strong,” said Packers head coach Mike McCarthy. “But it is unusual.”

No, insanity works just fine, and absurdity will do in a pinch. How else can you describe this failed media strategy by the Packers brass to cover its own football malpractice with a clumsy smear campaign against Favre? After weeks and months of stumbling and bumbling, on Tuesday afternoon, the Packers threw McCarthy out into the public light and allowed him to be the stooge who tried to execute this dumber than dumb plan.

The plan is to paint Favre as some emotionally confused and tortured soul who doesn’t know what he wants. The plan was to characterize Favre as the bad guy, even though we all know management pushed him into making a rushed decision on retiring in the first place. And when months later, he predictably had a change of heart, management unsuccessfully tried to send him away last week with a transparent $25 million bribe/golden parachute.

Yet when Favre wouldn’t take the money, he sure didn’t look or sound conflicted when he did. Favre repeated the same theme: He wants to play. When I saw him practicing with all those high school kids all summer long, that didn’t look like a guy who didn’t know what he wanted to do with his life. It reminded me that for everyone who has ever played sports, our ability to compete runs out long before our desire does.

Someone always tells us when to go. But there are precious few lucky ones who get to leave on their own terms. Favre still has the desire and the ability and he doesn’t want anyone to tell him he can’t still play. So if the Packers don’t want him, he can’t understand why they won’t let him go play somewhere else.

But team president Mark Murphy, general manager Ted Thompson and McCarthy want to have it both ways. They don’t want him, but they don’t want anyone else to have him. So they just kept procrastinating, and Favre forced their hands by filing his reinstatement papers, hopping a plane to Green Bay for training camp and essentially telling the team “play me or trade me.”

Yet for all this “he said-he said” silliness, we can condense this story into one easy sentence:

There is no good explanation for why anyone with half a brain would want to run one of the greatest quarterbacks in NFL history out of town.

But that’s exactly what McCarthy and the other two stooges, Thompson and Murphy, have done. They have told Favre — who last year after 16 years in the NFL, even at the age of 38 was arguably one of the two or three best quarterbacks in the game — that his services were no longer needed or wanted.

When Favre called and said he’d changed his mind about his retirement, and wanted to play again, the correct answer should have been, “Do you want me to drive, or should I send a plane for you?"

When you have three quarterbacks on your roster and none of them have started a single NFL game, and when your so-called first-string passer’s entire career statistics don’t even equal Favre’s best game, the correct response should have been uncontrollable glee with the “Hallelujah Chorus” as background music.

Yet for some absurd reason, Green Bay’s response was to act like Favre had cooties.

So shortly after Favre drove out of the Packers training camp on Tuesday — apparently on the verge of successfully forcing the team to at long last trade him — a reporter asked McCarthy why the team chose this insane strategy.

“I don’t have a short answer for you,” said the coach.

Well what’s the long answer, he was asked?

“We don’t have enough time.”

Well actually, we have plenty of time, but it’s doubtful that McCarthy and his buddies have any good answers, long or short. “Having crossed the Rubicon once when Brett decided to retire, it's very difficult to reorient our plans and cross it again in the opposite direction — but we'll put this to our advantage," Murphy said a few days ago.

So this was putting it to your advantage?

You bring him in, create a distracting media carnival, split the locker room, put Aaron Rogers in an impossible, no-win situation, leave Favre twisting in the wind for another day, then trot your head coach/fall guy out in front of the public to be painted as the perceived villain who ran Favre out of town?

Just out of curiosity, what the heck was Plan B?

As he tried to awkwardly make his way through Tuesday’s media inquisition, McCarthy tried once again to say that the reason Favre wasn’t welcome into the locker room was because “he wasn’t in a mindset to play for the Green Bay Packers . . . Given his mindset, why would I let anyone of a negative mindset into our locker room?”

Here’s a better question: Given his obvious Hall of Fame talent and his negative mindset, how stupid do you have to be to have created a situation where the most significant player in your franchise’s history would feel so betrayed?

I believe they call this biting your nose to spite your face.

© 2008 NBC Sports.com
URL: http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/26047024/